Seeing red in a new light: Peacock spider courtship defies our human assumptions

The pattern on male Maratus volans' tails is noticeable even without their red coloration

How do animals choose their mates? Dr. Maddie Girard and Dr. Damian Elias were pretty sure they knew what female peacock spiders found sexy—it had to be the red. Found throughout Australia, these tiny jumping spiders have excellent vision, and instead of a making a web, they sneak, climb, and pounce to catch their food. … Continue reading Seeing red in a new light: Peacock spider courtship defies our human assumptions

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I’ll have what she’s having: Manipulation in chimpanzee copulation calls

When we think about animal relationships, some endearing examples of devoted couples come to mind: emperor penguins that faithfully guard their hatchlings for weeks while they wait for their mate to return; love birds (not surprisingly) that groom and feed each other during courtship, and some species of monkeys that intertwine their tails as they … Continue reading I’ll have what she’s having: Manipulation in chimpanzee copulation calls

Love stings: Sexual selection on wasp spots

Sexual selection has resulted in some of the most flamboyant and outrageous ornaments in the natural world. The flashy plumes of the peacock tail, regal fringe of the lion’s mane, and vibrant colors of the agamid lizard all advertise males’ merits as mates to females. Although sexually selected traits are regularly observed in mammals, birds, … Continue reading Love stings: Sexual selection on wasp spots